¨Color Wheel – Tool for organizing colors—the spectrum is bent into a circle.

¨Hue – The name of a spectral color—red, blue, yellow

¨Primary Colors – Are hues that cannot be made by mixing other hues together—red, yellow, blue

¨Secondary Colors – Are hues that are made by mixing two primary hues together—orange, green, violet

¨Tertiary Colors – Are hues that are made by mixing a primary and a secondary hue together—“the hyphenated names”—blue-violet, red-orange, yellow-green (6 total)

¨Intensity – The brightness or dullness of a hue. A pure hue is called a high-intensity color—straight out the
tube. A dulled hue is called a low-intensity color—mixed with compliment.


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Tint – A light value of a hue made by mixing the hue with white.

¨Shade – A dark value of a hue made by adding black to it.

¨Color Scheme – Plan for organizing color.

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Cool Colors – Blue, Green, Violet—suggest coolness and seem to recede from the viewer. Can be used as a color scheme.

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Warm Colors – Red, Orange, Yellow—suggest warmth and seem to move towards the viewer. Can be used as a color scheme.

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Monochromatic – A color scheme that only uses one hue and all of it’s values—tints, shades

¨Analogous – Colors that sit side by side on the color wheel and have a common hue—violet, red-violet, red. Can be used as a color scheme.

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Complimentary – The colors opposite each other on the color wheel—strongest contrast to that color—red, green. Mixing a hue with its compliment dulls it. Can be used as a color scheme.

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Split Complimentary – One hue and the hues on each side of its compliment on the color wheel—red-orange, blue, green. Can be used as a color scheme.

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Triad- Colors that are equally spaced on the color wheel